FAQ

WHO MAY CULTIVATE UNDER PROP 215


Patients with a physician's recommendation and their primary caregivers, defined as, "The individual designated by the person exempted under this act who has consistently assumed responsibility for the housing, health, or safety of that person." According to a state supreme court decision, People v Mentch (2008), caregivers must supply some other service to patients than just providing marijuana. As an alternative, SB 420 allows patients to grow together in non-profit "collectives" or cooperatives. Collectives may scale the SB 420 limits to the number of members, but large gardens are always suspect to law enforcement. In particular, grows over 100 plants risk five-year mandatory minimum sentences under federal law. Many local governments have moved to ban or sharply restrict the right of patients to grow collectively. Policy varies greatly around the state.

HOW MUCH CAN I POSSESS OR GROW?


Under Prop. 215, patients are entitled to whatever amount of marijuana is necessary for their personal medical use. However, patients are likely to be arrested if they exceed the SB 420 guidelines. SB420 sets a baseline statewide guideline of 6 mature or 12 immature plants, and 1/2 pound (8 oz.) processed cannabis per patient. Individual cities and counties are allowed to enact higher, but not lower, limits than the state standard. See local limits. Patients can be exempted from the limits if their physician specifically states that they need more for their own personal use.

In a state Supreme Court ruling, People v. Kelly (2010), the court held that patients can NOT be prosecuted simply for exceeding the SB 420 limits; however, they can be arrested and forced to defend themselves as having had an amount consistent with their personal medical needs. Patients can be exempted from the limits if their physician specifically states that they need more.

CAN I STILL BE ARRESTED OR RAIDED?


Yes, unfortunately. Many legal patients have been raided or arrested for having dubious recommendations, for growing amounts that police deem excessive, on account of neighbors' complaints, etc. Once patients have been charged, it is up to the courts to pass judgment on their medical claim. A landmark State Supreme Court decision, People vs. Mower, holds that patients have the same right to marijuana as to any legally prescribed drug. Under Mower, patients who have been arrested can request dismissal of charges at a pre-trial hearing. If the defendant convinces the court that the prosecution hasn't established probable cause that it wasn't for medical purposes, criminal charges are dismissed. If not, the patient goes on to trial, where the prosecution must prove "beyond a reasonable doubt" that the defendant is guilty. Those who have had their charges dropped may file to have their property returned and claim damages. In some cases, police raid patients and take their medicine without filing criminal charges. In order to reclaim their medicine, patients must then file a court suit on their own.

ARE ID CARD LEGAL TO USE?


Yes and no. Ony signed documents are considered legal recommendations. If your ID card is signed by you and the doctor then it is a miniature recommendation. However, any ID card that is not signed by the doctor or by you is technically illegal and not to be used with authenticating your entry and purchase at a collective or for law enforcement. ID cards have become so prevalent that many collectives and even law enforcement officers will accept them with the valid signatures but technically speaking they are not legal docuemnts if they haven't been signed.

WHERE CAN I GROW MEDICINE?


Although Prop. 215 allows patients to grow their own medicine, landlords are not legally obliged to allow it. Many cities and counties have passed zoning ordinances that restrict where patients can grow, in some cases outlawing outdoor cultivation altogether. See local policies.

 

CAN I SELL MY EXCESS MEDICINE?


In general sales of marijuana are NOT permitted under Prop 215. However, SB 420 authorizes legal caregivers and collective/cooperative members to charge for their expenses in growing for others on a "non-profit" basis. Hostile police sometimes misinterpret this to take any monetary proceeds as evidence of felony sales, regardless of whether the grower actually made a profit. Growers who provide for others must either be members of a collective or be bona fide "primary caregivers."

 

Services

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